…. more than 2 weeks at sea. (by Katharina Hübner)

Travelling through infinite sceneries even though they may look the same on the surface.

Bizarre images of ships that look like blockhouses… sometimes seeing only their silhouette in the fog or in the middle of the sunset painted in the deepest orange and dark blue of the water.
Dolphins playing in the water… jellyfish… glowing plankton. All the magnificent shapes of the sea and the sky.

I’m happy to be joining the Tres Hombres for a while. Where time is taking turns in her own way.
Alongside the crew and the other trainees. Learning. Listening. Taking it all in. Deepening knowledge and
learning so many new things. Knots and ropes songs and jokes. And that “real sailors always look up”.

The crew members explained procedures patiently over and over again. Sharing their knowledge and
passion. It’s a good place to be. I feel at home on the water and on this ship.

Surrendering to nature’s subtle and strong language. Connecting to all that is and moving along with her.
Learning to be part of her poem at sea again. We only have this one planet. It’s more than time to slow down and grow backwards in all the expanding and racing of the economy.
Focus on the old ways again that knew better how to live in rhythm with nature. Respect and protect her and all life that is.
I hope that many more will be inspired by this nature-friendly way of travelling and “growing business”.
It relaxes the soul and eases the mind. If all our actions guarantee to keep a healthy environment we must be full of good life as well cause we are part of it all.

Thinking a lot of my grandmas these days and all my siblings I am also looking forward to home on earth.
Seeing my beloved forests, rivers, animals and human family…curious how it will feel stepping and dancing on firm ground again.
And a big part of my heart that always loved travelling is looking forward to exploring life at sea soon again and sailing off to yet unknown shores and waters… to the world’s secrets and beauty unfolding to the ones who want to see and feel her.
To new and ancient stories to be told.

xxx

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FEMMES A BORD (by Lea Cognet)

Saviez vous qu´en anglais, les bateaux sont genrés au féminin ?

Quand j´ai envoyé ma candidature pour naviguer sur le Tres Hombres, j´ai imaginé que j´allais devoir cohabiter avec des hommes pendant plus de trente jours, dans un espace réduit, en pleine mer, sans autre échappatoire que de grimper dans les voiles.
Heureusement, en parcourant le site, j´ai pu trouver de nombreux temoignages de femmes ayant navigué sur ce bateau. J´ai tout de meme attendu le jour du départ non avec craintes mais avec quelques questionnements. Et a ma grande joie, quand je suis arrivée pour embarquer, j´ai constaté que l´équipage était paritaire. Huit femmes, huit hommes, et que vogue la brigantine
Cela peut paraitre une petite chose, lorsque de nos jours de plus en plus de domaines s´ouvrent a la parité. Mais comme ailleurs, le domaine de la navigations etait encore trop peu inclusif il y a quelques années. Allez trouver des témoignages de femmes marins et vous verrez comme elles ont du se battre pour garder leur pieds sur le pont et barrer comme les autres.
Quelle joie d´avoir une bosco, véritable couteau suisse toujours en mouvement. responsable des outils touchant aux cordages et aux voiles ; de se faire enseigner les differents cordages et comment étarquer par la matelote ; d´apprendre de la cuisiniere comment gerer le roulis la bouilloire a la main, et de pouvoir partager tout cela avec mes quatres collegues stagiaires. Il fut un temps oú nous etions interdites a bord, et nous voila, hissant les voiles pour narguer les vieux esprits.
Qu´est ce que cela m´apporte ? Une joie immense, de la confiance et de l´espoir. La petite fille qui voulait etre une pirate vit en moi ses meilleurs moments, et fait grandir la femme que je suis. Tout ce que je vois faire, je peux tenter de me l´approprier, l´apprendre, le faire a mon tour. Le savoir me rend forte, le faire, encore plus.
Femmes de tous bords, si naviguer vous fait envie, jetez vous dans l´aventure. Pour changez vos perspectives, celles des jeunes filles et femmes autour de vous et celle de la société pour sur !

Lea

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14 days of tacking (sailing against the wind) by captain Andreas Lackner

“Tres Hombres, Tres Hombres, Tres Hombres, this is Cherbourg Traffic, what is your intention please?”

Dear lady on the VHF radio, we are going to Copenhagen, is this not clearly visible?

Clearly not, because this is the 3rd time the French traffic control has called us up to check on our actions. If you look at our track, you might think that at a certain time we had enough of it, opened the cargo hold and started drinking into the endless amount of wine in there. Currently, we are drawing Lizard’s eyes above Cape de la Hague.

After the NW wind we had for coming up from La Rochelle, it changed to North for going up to Ireland and after changing the voyage plan and heading for the Channel of La Manche it turned to ENE. Not often you got the chance of training a crew so intensely in tacking a little square rigger and now they know their lines by heart and we tack without dropping a sail including flying jib with an ever-smiling and joking crew.

After all, it´s a mental struggle, seeing the ship move with a good speed every day but not going anywhere, and that for 14 days. There is no escape from it, not for a moment, no real private space for one, no personal wishes fulfilled, no special treat just for oneself. But somehow this seems not so needed. All crew is delighted with the same treats out of the galley or someone’s stories or music. Privacy changes into sharing and taking care of ship and each other. Treats out of private stocks are shared with the watch, and knowledge of crew is shared with the trainees.

As we are slowly running out of lectures, today I have to tell about the time we were building the ship and how the idea of re- re- reintroducing cargo sailing came into our mind and what we expect or hope for the future.
Mostly we were thinking about efficiency. There is nothing more efficient in moving cargo than a sailing ship, no question about that. Energy comes out of the sky and the arms of sailors, all organic. The new crew pays for the apprenticeship, and the old crew gets paid for their work onboard and their investment in licenses and training. Cargo owners pay direct fees to the ship for the transport of goods per mile (direct distance) and the ship pays expenses for the crew, food, maintenance, agents, tows and paperwork. And now, for example, one hand plays a Spanish song on the guitar and the sounds come floating through the hatch. The word efficiency does not merely fit what is going on here.

For the conventional ship, you first have to dig out oil or gas, mostly through the sea bed. Nice job, good money for a few. Then you make a giant ship with not necessarily attractive lines. Also a nice job with good money for a few.
Then you sort out where you can get massive amounts of useless trash, produced by squeezed-out workers and fields in places where just the brokers and leaders get rich, for the demands of an intoxicated society listening to their space gurus talking about virtual shit.
Then you find a crew who speaks a bit of English, has no tacking experience needed, and go driving the boat. Not such a good job, except if you are captain or officer, where at least your time is accordingly paid.
They made highways for these ships because there are so many and you can see on the yellow horizon where the highways are. They don´t want sailing ships in there.
So efficiency realized by mistreated nature and people is no efficiency, that is clear now. HOW CLEAR CAN WE MAKE THAT, SO IT IS UNDERSTOOD?

1500 miles of sailing for 380 miles of distance in the most effective way possible.

We might realize that the JOY from some-thing which comes via that inefficient, now called conventional way,  is not shared on the other side of the world, where it comes from. Not from men, not from nature. Just from a few open hands on the way which collect the dollar. And your space guru.

We finished the Lizards eye and are now for the first time heading for Copenhagen.

Ahoy

 

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Jugendtraum (von Torsten Schulz)

Wir segeln gerade “um die Ecke”, bei Ouessant, also aus dem Kanal in den Atlantik, auf dem Weg von  Amsterdam nach Les Sables d’Olonne.

Als Jugendlicher las ich alle Hornblower-Romane, die zum Teil genau hier spielen. Beim Lesen versuchte ich mir damals vorzustellen, wie ein Rahsegler und wie das Navigieren in Gezeitengewässern ohne Motor mit einigermaßen Sicherheit und Pünktlichkeit funktioniert. Jetzt, 40 Jahre später, stille ich mit dieser Reise auf dem Lastensegler Tres Hombres diese Jugendneugier.

Das aus Kriegszeiten stammende Holzschiff mit bewegter Geschichte flößt im “Schleuderprogramm”-Wellengang und durch das Saitenspiel bei Sturm in der Takelage nicht nur Ehrfurcht vor den Elementen ein, sondern vor allem Respekt für Andreas, den Kapitän, und seine Crew begeisterter SeglerInnen, die das Schiff routiniert im Griff haben. Das Mitmachen von uns, die wir Trainees genannt werden, ist  gewünscht und gefordert, gerade weil es keinen Motor, keine Winschen und keine künstliche Segel-Intelligenz an Bord gibt, sondern alles auf Teamwork, Geschicklichkeit, Umsicht und Muskelkraft ankommt. Wir Trainees sind Teil des Mehrschichtbetriebs an Bord, Tag und Nacht. Mit dieser Reise verlasse ich die Komfortzone, die sich mit Plastikmüll in Ozeanen und umweltverschmutzenden globalen Lieferketten als trügerisch erweist.

Dies ist an sich schon Abenteuer genug. Was es jedoch zu einem besonderen Erlebnis macht, ist der Humor und die Geduld, mit der Andreas und seine Crew alles erklären und begleiten. In die Rahen klettern und Segel setzen gehören zum Trainee-Alltag wie die Bilge per Hand pumpen und das Steuerrad führen.

Wer eine bessere, fairere und inklusivere Welt wünscht, in der der Mensch und nicht Kapital und Maschinen im Zentrum stehen, sollte beim Anbordgehen Mitmenschlichkeit und Offenheit mitbringen und findet dafür hier im Kleinen, was alles möglich ist:
Handwerkskunst beim Instandhalten von Tauen, Holz und Schiffsgerät unterwegs an Bord, seglerisches Können, Mut und  Kraft in den Rahen, und Begeisterung für ein Metier, das genauso wie andere bedrohte Arten auch zum wahren Reichtum unseres Planeten gehören. Der Mensch ist seine Bedrohung und Chance zugleich. Tres Hombres und seine vielen bewegenden Menschen sind eine Chance, die es zu ergreifen und zu unterstützen gilt, da sie Impulse auch über sich hinaus geben: die Verpflegung an Bord stammt von lokalen Bio-Landwirten und wird von einer kundigen Köchin köstlich zubereitet, die Seife an Bord ist eine handwerklich  hergestellte Meerwasser-taugliche Seife aus Ingredienzen, die Tres Hombres herübergesegelt hat, der an Bord getrunkene Kaffee ist fair hergestellt und ohne Luftverschmutzung transportiert.

Der Wunsch aus Jugendzeiten ging  für mich hier an Bord in Erfüllung und weit darüber hinaus. Ich kann die Erfahrung  nur weiterempfehlen.

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Jugendtraum (von Torsten Schulz)

Wir segeln gerade “um die Ecke”, bei Ouessant, also aus dem Kanal in den Atlantik, auf dem Weg von  Amsterdam nach Les Sables d’Olonne.

Als Jugendlicher las ich alle Hornblower-Romane, die zum Teil genau hier spielen. Beim Lesen versuchte ich mir damals vorzustellen, wie ein Rahsegler und wie das Navigieren in Gezeitengewässern ohne Motor mit einigermaßen Sicherheit und Pünktlichkeit funktioniert. Jetzt, 40 Jahre später, stille ich mit dieser Reise auf dem Lastensegler Tres Hombres diese Jugendneugier.

Das aus Kriegszeiten stammende Holzschiff mit bewegter Geschichte flößt im “Schleuderprogramm”-Wellengang und durch das Saitenspiel bei Sturm in der Takelage nicht nur Ehrfurcht vor den Elementen ein, sondern vor allem Respekt für Andreas, den Kapitän, und seine Crew begeisterter SeglerInnen, die das Schiff routiniert im Griff haben. Das Mitmachen von uns, die wir Trainees genannt werden, ist  gewünscht und gefordert, gerade weil es keinen Motor, keine Winschen und keine künstliche Segel-Intelligenz an Bord gibt, sondern alles auf Teamwork, Geschicklichkeit, Umsicht und Muskelkraft ankommt. Wir Trainees sind Teil des Mehrschichtbetriebs an Bord, Tag und Nacht. Mit dieser Reise verlasse ich die Komfortzone, die sich mit Plastikmüll in Ozeanen und umweltverschmutzenden globalen Lieferketten als trügerisch erweist.

Dies ist an sich schon Abenteuer genug. Was es jedoch zu einem besonderen Erlebnis macht, ist der Humor und die Geduld, mit der Andreas und seine Crew alles erklären und begleiten. In die Rahen klettern und Segel setzen gehören zum Trainee-Alltag wie die Bilge per Hand pumpen und das Steuerrad führen.

Wer eine bessere, fairere und inklusivere Welt wünscht, in der der Mensch und nicht Kapital und Maschinen im Zentrum stehen, sollte beim Anbordgehen Mitmenschlichkeit und Offenheit mitbringen und findet dafür hier im Kleinen, was alles möglich ist:
Handwerkskunst beim Instandhalten von Tauen, Holz und Schiffsgerät unterwegs an Bord, seglerisches Können, Mut und  Kraft in den Rahen, und Begeisterung für ein Metier, das genauso wie andere bedrohte Arten auch zum wahren Reichtum unseres Planeten gehören. Der Mensch ist seine Bedrohung und Chance zugleich. Tres Hombres und seine vielen bewegenden Menschen sind eine Chance, die es zu ergreifen und zu unterstützen gilt, da sie Impulse auch über sich hinaus geben: die Verpflegung an Bord stammt von lokalen Bio-Landwirten und wird von einer kundigen Köchin köstlich zubereitet, die Seife an Bord ist eine handwerklich  hergestellte Meerwasser-taugliche Seife aus Ingredienzen, die Tres Hombres herübergesegelt hat, der an Bord getrunkene Kaffee ist fair hergestellt und ohne Luftverschmutzung transportiert.

Der Wunsch aus Jugendzeiten ging  für mich hier an Bord in Erfüllung und weit darüber hinaus. Ich kann die Erfahrung  nur weiterempfehlen.

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Life on Tres Hombres (by Michael Balshaw)

Life on Tres Hombres has been an experience and a half!

After a few years where we all had a life constraining effect from corona and a chance meeting with an old friend who had sailed on Tres Hombres previously my heart was set on an adventure.
A sailing trip from Amsterdam to Les Sables in France to pick up a shipment of fine wine was booked and the waiting began.

Only having sailed once before I am a novice sailor so before the trip began I had lots of questions. Many of these were answered in a very informative handbook that arrived a week or so before the trip. It is not necessary to have all the latest sailing gear but as long as you are prepared for all weathers it is enough. I respected the advice not to go out and buy new things but to make use of second hand, borrowed or recycled goods. This goes to the very heart of the ethos of the organisation. Transporting goods ethically across the world and at the same time allowing people to learn, experience and enjoy sailing on such a fine vessel.

When it was time for the adventure to begin I set off to meet the ship and the crew where I would be spending the next couple of weeks. After the confines of the previous years, it was a joy to get together with people from all over the world, of different ages and different amounts of sailing experience from the novice like me to vastly experienced sailors but all wanting to experience this unique vessel.

It is important to bring with you an open mind. This is not luxury but you gain so much more. On my arrival, I discovered the intended date of departure could not be met due to some repairs needed on the wooden ship which I learn are constantly ongoing and fascinating to watch and learn from. But also due to the wind. An engineless vessel relies on wind and quickly earths whoever sails upon her into the beautiful natural rhythms of nature. Indeed life on board quickly settles into a rhythm. Watch periods are punctuated with amazing food from the galley cook and the galley in a way becomes the beating heart of the ship. The time before departure was not wasted. We had time to bond as a group and literally learn the ropes and how life on board works. Onboard the crew share their passion for sailing on this boat openly and warmly and in a way, we are all learning together. Learning from each other, from nature and learning to work together. Without the teamwork inherent in the boat, the boat doesn’t work so we do it together. You are invited to take part in all aspects of life on the boat. Slowly you learn at your own pace and settle into life on the open waves.

You will experience all different weathers, seas, clouds, rain, sun and stars in the company of fellow adventurers. Quiet times are punctuated with intense periods of action. We trace our progress across the map as we near the destination always reliant upon the elements to get us there so timing can never be precise. I am writing this from the ship just off the coast of Brittany with strong winds and high waves and I feel alive!

Once at the destination, I will help load the cargo before beginning my journey home and this experience will become a memory. But what a memory it will be. Great food, great people, a vessel who is reliant and steady no matter what is thrown at her and an unforgettable bond with nature. My advice to anyone thinking of sailing on Tres Hombres is ‘do it’. Bring an open mind and a willingness to get involved and you will be rewarded with an adventure of a lifetime with an organisation doing good honest work.

LAST BUT NOT LEAST: THANK YOU GROENESTEK!

LOCATION NOTES:

Den Helder: for those who have been around Tres Hombres since her early days, this name will ring more than one bell and recall many memories. It is a town in Noord Holland which faces the island of Texel and looks over the Wadden Zee, with its place in the maritime history of the Dutch navy and fleet.

This is where the headquarters are, in Willemsoord. Where Teerenstra is, the shipyard where Tres Hombres drydocks and gets refitted since 2008. Just on the other side of the canal from the shipyard, there is a green oasis called De Groene Stek, managed by Judith, a strong woman who would deny a smile to no one!

Judith has a great team who works with her in the garden, a team made by special people who would be let apart in society otherwise, people who are differently able but so often get described as disabled. They work setting goals which are tailor-made for everyone involved in the project, matching their personal needs and aiming for real improvements, mental and physical benefits, creating a safe place of acceptance where people otherwise rejected by society can learn new skills.
Through growing veggies and herbs, they grow themselves too! Gardening becomes therapy for them, probably the best and most effective, a way to stay socially connected letting Nature do the healing that is needed.

From there we take the veggies we need for the refits and for the beginning of the winter voyages for many years. We go there to harvest them ourselves, to chat with the people, to cut the apples that will dry in the oven and be served as snacks on board, and to spend some time in this urban oasis of organic agriculture.

Fairtransport and De Groene Stek are long-term friends, Judith has been supporting many cooks and provisioning the galley of Tres Hombres for a long time, during the refit as well as at sea.
And she is so stunningly generous that fresh veggies aren’t the only gift she provides! Let Eddie tell you more about it…

PROVISIONING:

So we are coming to the end of the winter voyage. Reflecting on the time that has passed there is a very clear group that contributed to making the galley what it was.
Groenestek! You have been with us the whole way, and every person on board knows and is so grateful for your gifts. Thank you for your abundant generosity!

A short summary of what they gave
us…

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PROVISIONING IN THE AZORES

LOCATION NOTES:

There are some places that simply bewitch you. Faial is one of those indeed.

This little volcanic island in the middle of the Azorean Archipel is a classic stop for many sailors and seafarers for a long time. To split the long Northern Atlantic crossing into two legs, to restock on fresh provisions, to stretch the legs and fill up the lungs with pure ocean breeze loaded with a delightful scent of green grass, sailors stop in Horta and leave on the walls of the marina artistic signs of their passage, creating one of the most interesting open-air travel art galleries in the world! If you ever stop there, we challenge you to find all the drawings Tres Hombres has left over the years.

We have made many friends on the island, and it is always a bit like coming back home for those who have sailed there before.

The hospitality of the locals, who have learnt how to welcome and shelter sailors over many centuries, is legendary (just think of the most well-known example of it, the Peter’s Sport Bar). The island, with its green lush pastures and happy cows, is a hotspot for cheese lovers too. Blessed by the Gulf Stream which mitigates the climate, you can find both sub-tropical and continental varieties of fruits and vegetables too. Oranges and bananas grow next to each other, and a few years ago Tres Hombres’ crew, upon request of one of our farmer friends, brought even a seedling of cocoa. The little plant is now growing into a tree and seems to be pretty satisfied with its new home, soil and conditions.

From Horta, you can enjoy a stunning view of the next island, Pico, and its mighty volcano, which they are very proud of. The funny fact is that the locals in Horta say that the most beautiful thing about Pico is the view you have of it from Faial!

PROVISIONING:

Due to weather and schedule, I knew before arrival that it was set to be a shortstop in the Azores. I got in touch with Paula straight away,
who has been a friend and the contact of the ship for many years.  She was so kind and so helpful. The day after we arrived she took me
and some others on a drive around the island to visit some local producers.

First, we went to her family’s bakery where I was able to buy some extra 25kg sacks of flour at wholesale price (thank you!). She also gave us some of the delicious biscuits that they make.

Then we went to Emmanuel, her partner’s project. He has started a small company growing organically oyster mushrooms and has four grow rooms some of which look like some sort of SciFi world with pink lights and ducting. We also bought dried mushrooms for the galley, and be also ready to welcome them to the Fairtransport webshop of sail-shipped products soon!

We then walked to some of his land next door where he grew oranges and lemons which we picked straight from the trees. The ground had almost a carpet of wild mint and it was the most beautiful and overwhelming smell of mint and orange blossom as we walked. Those citrus jewels have been keeping our crew full of vitamin C for the final leg, the most important!

We also went to meet and visit Zuga, who showed us around her new land project and picked 40kg of bananas straight from her trees. Unfortunately, they haven’t ripened yet, but hopefully, it will be a nice treat for the summer trip!

Finally, we went to a beautiful home garden where we bought fresh salad and herbs. After 24 days at sea, all these leafy greens were much appreciated by the crew.

The next day Paula organized a tour around the island with the whole crew. What a lush day. Thank you, Paula, Emmanuel, Zuga, and all the locals who welcomed and helped us. Thank you Faial island, for a brief but beautiful last stop.

 

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MEET THE CREW

MEET OUR TRAINEE ARCO

Age:  60
Nationality: DUTCH
Position onboard: TRAINEE
Former occupation on land (aka how do you keep yourself busy when you are not sailing)?
I am a father of two. I work as occupational health physician, insurance physician, and an instituutsopleider at the Radboud
University in Nijmegen (e.g. training new medical specialists). I also volunteer for the local GroenLinks political party, in an
orchard pruning group and for the Slow Food Movement.
Which book, film, song and/or event inspired and sparked in you first the dream of a life at sea?
TV series: Sil de Strandjutter
Book:  In de Bovenjkooi from Jan Maarten Biesheuvel
Song:  Al die willen de kaapren varen
What to pack for your sea chest, absolutely?
A small waterproof (dry) bag for dinghy rides
What to leave ashore, doubtless?
Worries.
Which is your favourite peace corner onboard (aka where do you hide when you need to be alone?)
My bunk is my favourite place on board when I need a moment for myself.
Three magic words to hold fast to?
Look after each other.
Which wild creature would the ship be?
A Manatee.
Biggest fear before joining and greatest satisfaction on the way?
Getting health issues was my biggest fear before we left.
The biggest satisfaction is that I can be part of all this.
Why Tres Hombres?
To me, there is no alternative to the Tres. Who else sails cargo without an engine between Europe and the Caribbean and vice versa? And, for a good cause!

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PROVISIONING ON MARTINIQUE AND MARIE GALANTE

LOCATION NOTES:

Martinique belongs to the French Antilles and it is a well-known pit stop for many (especially French) sailors and cruisers on the Trade Winds route who like to drop their anchors in the many bays the island offers to restock on water, food, fresh croissants and baguettes!

The economy of the island strongly depends on a few agricultural crops such as bananas (first employer of the island) and sugar cane, used to produce the famous rhum agricole the one and only in the world to hold an AOC (Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée). Right after comes tourism, especially dense and developed in the south of the island where Tres Hombres lands.

It highly relies on mainland France for many resources. Landing in Martinique means also entering French territory, in all meanings. The most consumed and appreciated fruit of this tropical paradise is….the apple. But be sure there is not even one single apple tree growing on the whole island. We won’t dwell here on the post-colonialism issues and consequences that many islands in the Caribbean area still suffer nowadays, but it is essential we keep this awareness well sharp in mind.

Even street markets can be very expensive, many products are imported and the average tourist consumerism is one of the greatest sources of income for the local community. Once a pineapple grower, who also owned a stall at the local market, told us that she had to sell her pineapples very expensive in Martinique because she had to give most of her production to France. She cannot really set a fair price for it. So what remains of her harvest can then be sold freely in the market, but this is the only situation where she is able to choose the price of her fruits herself and to compensate for the little she earns by dealing with the mainland, the local market prices are skyrocketing.

*

Marie Galante, a little island southwest of Guadalupe, is a true pearl and offers a different experience. Definitely more rural than its bigger sisters, Marie Galante still conserves some of its real wild and authentic beauty. Still pretty untouched by the invasive mass tourism and the wicked private construction which ravaged many of the other islands, the time seems to have stopped here. The local community is still very attached to its customs and tradition, animal traction is still widely preferred to mechanical labor of the soil. More oxen and less tractors!

We love this island and try to respect it as best as we can.

PROVISIONING:

I was in such a daze stepping on land for the first time in three weeks when I went to the first little market in Saint Anne that I think I may have got a little ‘done’. I remember thinking that the kilo price for the bananas seemed high, but I was so scrambled and overwhelmed by being off the boat I didn’t properly clock it. Luckily it was only a quick little shop I did there with not too much money wasted.

At the next market in Le Marin, I was a bit more on it, although definitely feeling hindered by not speaking French. The ladies there were businesswomen and know how to hustle. I definitely bought some unintended pineapples as a result of this! However the food was good and I was keen to stock up the dry store after the crossing, especially as I wasn’t sure if we would be able to go ashore in Barbados because of Covid rules. I bought breadfruit at the market and once it got soft and sweet I fried up like plantain. Most of the people on board had not eaten it before. When I provision it’s important for me to find unusual local items and for the food we eat to evolve and change with our surroundings.

Marie Galante

Such a tiny, tiny little island. Marie Galante has a population of 10,000 and only three small villages. In the village we were closest to there were two little veg stalls. With the help of Cami, our Bosun and native French speaker, we managed to organize a larger order of vegetables through one of these stalls. They were quite happy about it, so we got offered to pick up any old veggie that couldn’t be sold, for free. The average tourist cares a bit too much about the sexiness of the fruits and veggies. The first night of picking up a BIG vegetable soup was made!

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