The Northern Route (by captain Andreas Lackner)

Yes, there is a lot to tell about our adventures in the Baltic Sea, Kattegat, Skagerrak and the
Sound …

but let’s start with an impression of the alternative route from Holland to Ireland, over the
top of Scotland.Cargo ships have schedules, which always have two sides. Or you are lucky and sail ahead of it, then
you can hang out on pretty islands or sightsee-sail around them, or you have to take the fastest route
to get there in time.

Last weekend, while our short stop in Den Helder we had the choice: wait until
the south-west storm passes and then tack for 10 days against variable winds (the shorter route) or
take the chance and go around the British Isles, 500 miles more.
Checking the weather forecasts did not give a clear picture while the wind was picking up from the
south and above all, there was constantly a saying from our first voyages ghosting along my head: Gy
zult geen goede wind verleggen!! Now, let’s go then! Dirk, Louise, Marco, and Miranda brought us out
into the Schulpengat, where we started tacking just as the current turned and soon made our way
around the shoals and up north.

At first, legislation and economy kept us in their grip, traffic scheme
after oil rig after windmill park…it is amazing out there! War on nature and sailing ships is going on, as
usual, there is absolutely no change recognizable on the North Sea. New oil and gas fields are
exploited, trying to keep up against Russia and the Middle East, new windmill parks drilled and
cemented into the seabed, trying to color our energy-wasting green, and those pretty purple stripes
on our chart, the TSS (traffic separation scheme). 3 separate ones just off Den Helder!
As a sailing ship you have to alter course and do everything possible to cross those imaginary but still ruling lines
at a right angle, and if you do not totally succeed in crossing at 90 degrees because of wind and
currents, they see you with their eye of justice, call you up and prosecute you, even if there is not a
single ship around you could impede of its course of justice!

But finally, you get up to the Pentland Firth, where the world changes into a beautiful and exciting
challenge with nature. Changing winds and strong currents with magic eddies, many new birds, white
striped dolphins, seals, and even a Minky on the road. The wind was kind and kept us minimal
steerage through the dangerous passage and even turned with us after passing Cape Wrath. Now
heading to the Hebrides, closely passing rock after rock and discovering a new seabird every hour,
the crew is content that we choose this route instead of our good known old friend, the canal de la
Manche.

So far we had a great voyage this summer with several cargoes, still, the voyage is becoming a long
one now for some of the crew, which have been onboard since mid-December, but also coming to an
end, as we have to deliver a functional and ready-to-load ship back in France. The wine delivery was
not the only one this summer, as the people in Copenhagen are unbelievably thirsty and only seem
to drink natural wine there! Our friend Sune Rosforth has introduced a whole new wine drinking
culture there in Denmark, with his charm, knowledge, and unstoppable perseverance. Since him,
Copenhagen is, next to Tokyo, the capital of natural wine worldwide. Copenhagen still has the
advantage of the transport 😉

We had a wonderful time in our Danish offloading ports Copenhagen (Under the bridge at Sune’s)
and in Gudhjem, the ancient natural port on Bornholm, where we lay in front of Provianten, the Havn
Bar of our great friends and clients Maria and Thomas. As the winds were kind to us on the way up there,
we had some time to spare and used it in all kinds of ways, painting the ship, exploring and
feasting over the island, getting to know many friendly locals, and sharing a taste of rum with even
more…

Due to the wind, we decided to pay a visit to Christianso where we anchored overnight and were
woken by howling seals on the easternmost rocks of Denmark.
Back to Copenhagen, we discharged a load of Svaneke beer, which was accompanied by master
brewer Jan Paul, who made even some beer on the voyage in our galley. Some precious boatbuilding
oak from Bornholms sawmill Koefoed was loaded for Den Helder, where it will be used in one of the
local sail cargo projects.

We also visited the Danish sail cargo project Hawila in Holbek, where the international crew worked
hard to get this beautiful Baltic Trader back in sailing shape again, renewing structural parts as well as
constructing a substantial hold for future cargo and art-ventures! We wish them very well and hope
more enthusiast and talented craftswo-men to join their team.

Now all sails are set, bound for Cork in Ireland, where we receive a cargo of beer for France, we hope
that corona rules will allow us a shore leave, as for many of us it would be the first pint in Ireland
ever!
In respect of wind, current, and rocks,

Andreas

 

Do you enjoy reading our crew’s adventures? Imagine being there when you enjoy our products at home!

Let’s go back to the sea (by captain Anne-Flore Gannat)

They never towed and moored a sailing ship before.

With a bit of ferm organization, we went up and down with the tide moored to the wall for 3 days.

The cargo is on board, about 8000 bottles. The truck drivers never had to deliver 7 pallets to a boat, they couldn’t believe it.
No samples. We are looking forward hearing more about this beer. The beers have interesting names like Ulster black, Stony grey, or the Red right hand or Whiskey aged.

The harbor of Cobh is colorful, each house seems to be painted in a different color. It has been a while since the locals did see a sailing ship loading some cargo and the kids keep being amazed to see a real pirate boat. They were hectic.

Only some time for little maintenance and here we go to sea again. Yesterday evening a wet strong breeze was blowing. When we woke up, the sky had enough to make choppy water in the channel, squeezing our new fenders from the garage between the hull and the wall. At 7:00 it was flat and clear.
It was the best morning to go along the ebb stream.

One tug to get away, turn around, set some sails, jumping on the big swell at the entrance, set more sails, try to be on the windward side of the channel, feed more tow line, do not break it, get rid of the pilot before the swell passes over the 2m, ask the tug to beer away to draw our sails properly and make sure to make the corner of the entrance, and go quietly without noisy engines around anymore.
The tow line is off and we have to haul on like hell to bring it back on deck. All the gears are spread all over the place, it’s not chaos only useful precious lines attached to wing propellers.
Sorry Royal, you won’t fly high this time. I prefer to keep you furled and the crew, down here.

It is epic, it is windy, it is the best moment to go if we don’t want to be stuck in southern Ireland for the winter. Only 270 miles.
Tonight we jibed to replace the ship into the west when it was still possible. Tomorrow morning we’ll jibe again when the wind shifts. We adopt the jibe when the sea is too heavy because the foredeck gets super wet in a tack when we are facing the swell and bracing gets hard to haul on. Hopefully we can make it to Douarnenez in one tack after that, even if the wind will be stronger.

We are all happy to do it as we will be happy to arrive and find ice cream! Don’t ask me why there is always someone onboard looking for ice cream everywhere in the world at any season!!!

Anne-Flore