Somewhere between Denmark and Copenhagen (by Clarissa Mayer)

Morning Watch

Exact time, day and date are not the most important parameters on board. Therefore, watch changes, meals and sea miles gained towards the desired destination make you notice time passing by.

After patiently awaiting the right wind and slowly moving along the southern Swedish coast, in the course of the night we finally made our way through the Copenhagen sound towards the Kattegat.

The gentle wake up of the other watch promises us a sunny windy day and a tasty breakfast. So we begin the day with fruit porridge, coffee and warm bread fresh from the oven to get ready for our morning watch.
After watch change daily chores call and we wash the deck and clean the galley. The major part of the watch is to take care of the sail handling, adjusting the sail trim to wind and course. So we gybe to change course, trim the sails and set the lower and upper bob to gain further speed. After some days on the same watch and a team experienced with the Tres, manoeuvres run quite smoothly.

Luckily, the wind gives us a break to enjoy the morning sun. So what to do? From my position on the helm helping our second mate to navigate through a lane of huge container cargo ships, I observe another type of action on deck. Guided by our oldest but most sporty watch member, my watch starts a Tabata class. Imagine three people engaging in 8 x 8 high intensity exercises on a moving deck. Utilizing the cargo hold and the aft and random planks as their sports gear. 20 seconds of action are always initiated by a sharp whistle and finished with a bell ring from the phone. This noise and the ever stronger swearing about the duration of the class are the only things that add to the sound of wind in the sails and waves against the hull.
What’s the tune? Sunshine … sunshine reggae … ”

Clarissa

 

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Vijftien maanden geleden (by deckhand Hanjo van Weerden)

…stapte ik als trainee aan boord van de Tres Hombres, zonder enig verstand van zeilen.

Ik voer mee de hele zomer, werkte mee op de scheepswerf, ging vervolgens mee naar de Carieb en nu ben ik deksman. Het kan gek lopen.

In de eeuwenoude traditie van de ommelandvaart, waar ook de Hanze uit voortkwam, zeilen wij door Skagerrak.
We zeilen waar 700 jaar geleden al de koggen uit Kampen, Zwolle, Hamburg, Brugge en verder voeren. Wij brengen wijn naar Kopenhagen en Bornholm.
Zij haalden haring bij Skanor, graan uit Oostland, bont uit Rusland.
Wij hebben dertien zeilen, zij hadden er maar eentje. In tegenstelling tot de tijd van Volcmar van Enesce en zijn schip de Brunte wacht ons geen Lübecker deernenkogge noch trage weken op de vitten, waar gewacht diende te worden –-wellicht vergeefs –- op de haring.
Ons wacht wijn en verwonderde blikken van de Kopenhagers.

Wij worden nu voor gek verklaard dat wij zonder motor door Skagerrak varen, toen was er geen andere keus. Het was simpelweg de enige optie. Het is wel bekend dat het flink kan spoken in het Skagerrak. De ommelandvaart was niet een reis die lichtvaardig werd ondernomen. Ik echter heb tot nu toe geluk gehad. Vorig jaar viel het mee, dit jaar is het nog rustiger. Hoewel het in beginsel niet per se leuk is om in zwaar weer te zeilen (geen slaap, zee in je laarzen) en ik afgelopen november op de Atlantische oceaan al een goede storm heb gehad, voel ik me toch een beetje bekocht dat ik niet het beruchte geraas van Skagerrak meemaak.

Ach ja, we moeten ook nog terug natuurlijk…

 

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It’s getting more and more quiet here (By captain Anne Flore Gannat)

After a beginning with 7 knots speed average, here we are, almost in Skagerrak.

30 miles away from the Danish coast and the low pressure eye caught up on us.
Sunny, catching fishes for lunch, oiling the mooring cleats and repairing Jibs. All of the sails are squeezed to avoid extra damages from shafing and swinging.

The crew gets a better sleep to recover from an intense sail training. 1.5 knots current to move us on an invisible flying carpet. Slowly reaching the destination.
The sound of the water along the hull is different. Bubbles instead of continuous flow.

I’ll let you ask the crew about this intimate environment which covers you at all times.
The voices, banging pans in the galley and the sound of the tools are more perceptible from down below when the wind has a break.

Almost all of us are resting under the water line inside a thick wooden cocoon skin.
Same as the bottles of wine, where the cargo is cooled down because of the sea temperature isolated by planks.
As the people aging in a rough and pure concept.

Sea birds were playing around the ship in the air while sailing and now the Boreal Fulmar follow us sitting on the water, paddling. Sometimes they argue with the teens, at times they accelerate to grab the mackerel hanging on a hook. Our pretty pets. Exterior fellows accompanying us on the road.

At the end of the afternoon a reasonably stronger breeze will support our ship to go.

For now, guitar melody is in the air and lunch is about to be ready.

A-F

 

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The Northern Route (by captain Andreas Lackner)

Yes, there is a lot to tell about our adventures in the Baltic Sea, Kattegat, Skagerrak and the
Sound …

but let’s start with an impression of the alternative route from Holland to Ireland, over the
top of Scotland.Cargo ships have schedules, which always have two sides. Or you are lucky and sail ahead of it, then
you can hang out on pretty islands or sightsee-sail around them, or you have to take the fastest route
to get there in time.

Last weekend, while our short stop in Den Helder we had the choice: wait until
the south-west storm passes and then tack for 10 days against variable winds (the shorter route) or
take the chance and go around the British Isles, 500 miles more.
Checking the weather forecasts did not give a clear picture while the wind was picking up from the
south and above all, there was constantly a saying from our first voyages ghosting along my head: Gy
zult geen goede wind verleggen!! Now, let’s go then! Dirk, Louise, Marco, and Miranda brought us out
into the Schulpengat, where we started tacking just as the current turned and soon made our way
around the shoals and up north.

At first, legislation and economy kept us in their grip, traffic scheme
after oil rig after windmill park…it is amazing out there! War on nature and sailing ships is going on, as
usual, there is absolutely no change recognizable on the North Sea. New oil and gas fields are
exploited, trying to keep up against Russia and the Middle East, new windmill parks drilled and
cemented into the seabed, trying to color our energy-wasting green, and those pretty purple stripes
on our chart, the TSS (traffic separation scheme). 3 separate ones just off Den Helder!
As a sailing ship you have to alter course and do everything possible to cross those imaginary but still ruling lines
at a right angle, and if you do not totally succeed in crossing at 90 degrees because of wind and
currents, they see you with their eye of justice, call you up and prosecute you, even if there is not a
single ship around you could impede of its course of justice!

But finally, you get up to the Pentland Firth, where the world changes into a beautiful and exciting
challenge with nature. Changing winds and strong currents with magic eddies, many new birds, white
striped dolphins, seals, and even a Minky on the road. The wind was kind and kept us minimal
steerage through the dangerous passage and even turned with us after passing Cape Wrath. Now
heading to the Hebrides, closely passing rock after rock and discovering a new seabird every hour,
the crew is content that we choose this route instead of our good known old friend, the canal de la
Manche.

So far we had a great voyage this summer with several cargoes, still, the voyage is becoming a long
one now for some of the crew, which have been onboard since mid-December, but also coming to an
end, as we have to deliver a functional and ready-to-load ship back in France. The wine delivery was
not the only one this summer, as the people in Copenhagen are unbelievably thirsty and only seem
to drink natural wine there! Our friend Sune Rosforth has introduced a whole new wine drinking
culture there in Denmark, with his charm, knowledge, and unstoppable perseverance. Since him,
Copenhagen is, next to Tokyo, the capital of natural wine worldwide. Copenhagen still has the
advantage of the transport 😉

We had a wonderful time in our Danish offloading ports Copenhagen (Under the bridge at Sune’s)
and in Gudhjem, the ancient natural port on Bornholm, where we lay in front of Provianten, the Havn
Bar of our great friends and clients Maria and Thomas. As the winds were kind to us on the way up there,
we had some time to spare and used it in all kinds of ways, painting the ship, exploring and
feasting over the island, getting to know many friendly locals, and sharing a taste of rum with even
more…

Due to the wind, we decided to pay a visit to Christianso where we anchored overnight and were
woken by howling seals on the easternmost rocks of Denmark.
Back to Copenhagen, we discharged a load of Svaneke beer, which was accompanied by master
brewer Jan Paul, who made even some beer on the voyage in our galley. Some precious boatbuilding
oak from Bornholms sawmill Koefoed was loaded for Den Helder, where it will be used in one of the
local sail cargo projects.

We also visited the Danish sail cargo project Hawila in Holbek, where the international crew worked
hard to get this beautiful Baltic Trader back in sailing shape again, renewing structural parts as well as
constructing a substantial hold for future cargo and art-ventures! We wish them very well and hope
more enthusiast and talented craftswo-men to join their team.

Now all sails are set, bound for Cork in Ireland, where we receive a cargo of beer for France, we hope
that corona rules will allow us a shore leave, as for many of us it would be the first pint in Ireland
ever!
In respect of wind, current, and rocks,

Andreas

 

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In the channel again (By captain Andreas Lackner)

After a harsh start through, more than over, the big swells, coming into the bay of Les Sables, we left the friendly town and tug behind us and got underway up the Biskay.

High, higha, Biskaya…true it was and many a stomach did not appreciate the food coming from our friends from the fertile land.

Tacking up against the westerly breeze shook out the last remnants of the landlife and made us forget about endless wine and cheese fast. After passing Ouessant with a smooth 11kn we turned right and undressed the old lady until her downwind garment and passed a smooth night along the Breton coast.

Island watching this morning, as Guernsey, Casquets and Alderney raced along us and now, just above Cherbourgh, we are caught in the current bringing the speed through the water of around 11kn back to 6 over the ground. Still she behaves as steady as ever, just waiting for the tide to turn in order to hurry up to Dover Strait and release us back into the North Sea. 18 days ago a strong north-easterly brought us down, now a south-westerly pushes us back up again … what can a cargo sailor wish more about?

Greetings from the wine carrier

Andreas

 

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Creation (by captain Anne-Flore)

The departure maneuver in Copenhagen was super cool and smooth!

It is great to move a big sailing ship like this in a harbor under sails. Nowadays being under sails inside a port is forbidden.
I allowed us to do it because it’s possible and it’s very important to understand your ship under all circumstances, in all places. It’s esthetic, it’s cheaper, it’s in silence, it’s an achievement. If you don’t try, you will never know the capacity of your ship and the ability of yourself to handle different situations. Pushing the boundaries means creation, without creation life is boring.

The smiles of the few crew members left on shore and Sune’s team singing for us were warming up our hearts. The Welcomes and the Good byes are precious. Later, I received pictures of the Tres Hombres from different spots on the coast. It’s hard to let a home, a friend sailing away. You feel like a part is missing in your heart. If you accept, the one who leaves goes lighter and stronger. The one who stays has to make sure that the inside healthy firework feeling will be recreated to get as high as possible to set it as a norm, life is exciting and too short to be wasted.

Yesterday we expected South wind all away through the narrow Sound Passage which wasn’t real. Of course, we tacked for a while, passed the ferry lanes which can be two at a time. Then the wind decreased so much that we were not under command, drifting on the edge of the channel to the right direction, but for how long?

No worries, we are safe, but that doesn’t mean that we have to wait for the miracle to come. So we dropped the dinghy into the water and Collin pushed us for an hour. At 7.30 pm we were out of the Passage. The current helped us to come in a wider area to progress and the wind came back from land. “Watch change” good luck.
Last night it was very rainy, sometimes 9 kts, dousing sails, sometimes 3 kts and setting sails.

In 24h the 6 new crew members got a large spectrum about what we are doing on deck with all this stuff above our heads. It doesn’t make sense yet. Don’t worry, you are part of the team and every hand is useful.
When you step on board you can’t be a spectator. And acting makes you understand “why”. You live the process into the details.

Today is sunny finally, linseed oil is spread here and there. As well as little repairs for the ship to go to Den Helder. Soon the big yearly refit comes…
(see you next year Copenhagen and Bornholm)

Anne-Flore and the crew thank the Rosforth & Rosforth team, Sabotoren and Provianten gigantically for their trust in Fairtransport and for bringing awareness to consume good quality products that help to provide healthy earth, healthy people, and working in short circuit organization.

Nordlys blog: As we dance this handcrafted wooden ship

Sailing cargo with the Nordlys.
A happy crew on a happy ship.
We sail from the Netherlands to Portugal and England,
from France to Germany and Denmark.
Sometimes storm, sometimes calm, sometimes sun, sometimes rain.

“Une grande ballet” on the oceans waves.
The flow of air which makes us move.
As we are dancing away from and towards the land.
The sun and stars are shining above us in the sky.

As we dance this handcrafted wooden ship,
The natural wines, olive oil and flowers, are dancing with us overseas.
Products from the earth, natural grown and cared with love.

“Une grande ballet” of quality and taste.
As we farm the land, as we sail the ship.
Producers, transporters and consumers meet.
We are dancing the melodies of life,
during this precious time here on earth.

Thriving like a grapevine, an olive tree or a flower of life.
The planet earth is meant to thrive.
Let us follow her tunes and dance her melody,
and she will be prosperous for every soul.

Captain Lammert

Nordlys blog: Sailing between the stars

Everything is moving in circles, everything is rhythm.
The waves of this rhythm are the universal heartbeat.
Life on Nordlys – living the rhythmic pulse of the sea.
This rhythm of life is moving forward in spirals.
The sun, the moon, the stars and the planets are all circling above us in the sky,
Sometimes clear to observe, sometimes obscured by clouds, mists and sheets of grey.
The clouds of water also travel with the spiralling moving flow of air.
These movements of air bring raindrops on our heads, wind in our hair and sunshine on our faces.

We are sailing this wooden ship over the surface of this beautiful planet we call earth.
Planet earth, full of water, spiraling through the universe.
This ocean planet is floating through the universe; sailing between the stars.
The magical life of circles, cycles and rhythms is forever spiraling upwards.

We are sailing this wooden ship through the breathing liquid of life.
We ARE the water, we ARE the rhythm, we ARE the spiral of life.
Like the ocean tides, we will be born and we will die,
Over and over again.
The ever changing rhythm of the universe –
No change to escape.
We are nature; and the rhythm of nature is our life.

Movement and flow ….. We travel with our wooden ship.
We bring cargo infused with rhythm and flow.
We sail with this flow, making peace with each moment
Trusting in natures rhythm.

Allowing life to deliver through us, not by us.
We are nature; technique is an entity within the universe which is living next to us.
We are no robots, we need natural food, we are the natural cycle not the technical one.
We can only thrive by rhythm of the nature.

As we remember our ancient ways to be re-anchored back into life again,
We are the new ancients, traveling back into fullness and flow
The way nature guides and gives in her own time,
we become a deeper, richer, more abundant and generous spiral.

Here we are on Nordlys; sailing this wooden ship.

Captain Lammert Osinga

Encounter on the the high seas of Tres Hombres and Nordlys

Last night the second mate, Alan, and I where studying the charts, weather and shipping. When he brought up, where Nordlys, the other sailing cargo ship of Fairtransport would be? We knew they had been discharging a cargo of wine and olive oil in Brixham, England, and where bound for Douarnenez, France, after that. This, to pick up wine for Copenhagen and Bornholm in the Baltic. So theoretically she would be somewhere in between Brixham and Douarnenez, and we where too. For the heck of it, I put the cursor on one of the ships on our AIS (Automatic Identification System), and really a chance of one in a million, but it was Nordlys!

Next moment I was on the radio: “Nordlys, Nordlys, Tres Hombres”… A few seconds later the familiar voice of the Master of Nordlys, Captain Lammert Osinga, could be heard: “Tres Hombres, Nordlys”. We changed to a working channel, and had a nice chat about our voyages and the available cargoes. We where pretty much on opposite courses, so we both only had to alter a bit to starboard to meet each other. So we agreed to arrange a meeting on the high seas, in a few hours.
Around an hour after midnight we saw the bright navigation lights, red above green, and the silhouette of Nordlys became apparent. Captain Lammert and I, discussed matters over the radio, and decided that the safest maneuver would be, that Tres Hombres would go hove too by bracing the foretop aback, and Nordlys would approach under reduced sail. Then we would lower our boat, as part of a man-overboard exercise, and sent over a delegation of our crew, with a drink and a cigar. As described happened. It was really the most impressive sight to see the Nordlys, gliding effortlessly through the mirror like see, only partly visible due to the moonlight. When our boarding team returned, with an exchange of gifts, everybody was over excited. Like a wild bunch of privateer’s we echoed our greetings and wishes, our Austrian deckhands shared their flasks of rum to celebrate the occasion. Then, accompanied by the timeless sound of Nordlys their Japanese foghorn, and Tres Hombres her Norwegian foghorn, Nordlys disappeared into the darkness again…

Truly yours,
Capt. Jorne Langelaan

LAST MINUTE OFFER: The need for wine from Rioja and the Bordeaux region sends our good ship Tres Hombres on a unexpected voyage in June and July from Amsterdam to Royan, Douarnenez and back this summer.
If you want to experience a coastal cargo voyage on a square rigger without engine with co-founder and captain Andreas Lackner, then come and join in!
Landlubbers will get sea legs, and old salts wil get a glimpse of how it was in the good days and how it will be!
For more info sail along or email booking@fairtransport.nl

Nordlys blog: As a team in the rhythm of the sea

We are navigating our way from Den Helder to the southern peninsula of Europe.
When you are sailing the North Atlantic waters in the early months of the year, the weather conditions might be sometimes a bit rough.
Fortunately there are nowadays good weather forecasts for the first days to come. The depressions developing on the Atlantic Ocean are moving northeast over the continent and bring us the southwesterly gales. Keeping a good eye on the forecast can be life saving. With this in mind we had to make a stop in Brixham and another one in Douarnenez.
While we were there and waiting for fair weather, we were able to do maintenance on the ship, we tested our new anchor winch and worked on sail training. Provisions for the ship came from local farmers.
Fellow sailors, shipwrights, local merchants and friends came by on the Nordlys. Creating a stable market and expanding ideas for the Fairtransport enterprise.

We departed from Douarnenez on a shiny sunday morning and tacked our way towards the Atlantic Ocean. The Bay of Biscay is well known for its rough seas and has to be avoided in the certain weather conditions.
With a ship like Nordlys you will need about four or five days of fair winds to cross this bay. This brings us to were we are right now. We are sailing southwards on the Atlantic swell about 150 nautical miles from Porto.
On board we are nine crew, so eighteen hands to handle the sails, ropes and rudder, preparing food and so forth..
As a team in the rhythm of the sea.

Porto will be our first harbor where we charge cargo of all kind. The hold will be filled with organic products from the Douro region. We will bring these products by wind and sail to the northern countries of the continent.
Transport makes it possible to eat delicious olives, taste an excellent olive oil,use Atlantic sea salt for your meals and enjoy a natural wine, in for example England, Germany, The Netherlands, Denmark and so forth. Products which are not only produced in a nature friendly way, but also transported so. Sometimes the work on the land is slightly harder, sometimes the transport takes a bit longer… The taste of it all is definitely better! Respect the laws of nature. And nature gives it back.

captain Lammert Osinga