When the Sun never sleep (by Collin Bertron/Deckhand)

It’s midnight, we wake up. It’s morning light outside! We can clearly see.

The deck, the water surrounding us, the faces of my shipmates, the horizon melting in thousands of colors of blue. The moon goes to sleep, the other watch also.
We’re alone on deck with a very light breeze.

We’re like an evolution in a painting. Time is suspended for another night, it’s not dark, not bright, just in between, eternal dusk, ethereal feeling of eternity.
Was midsummer celebration a couple of days ago, Saint Johns. But as we keep going North, it looks like a race with the time, even slow. It seems we are still winning a few minutes on him.
The wind, him, is not that regular and foreseeable. In one day, he blew us through Dover, flew us over Belgium and the Netherlands even before we had time to see it on the chart, but now is blowing somewhere else, letting us drifting in the North Sea, trimming our sails to try to find him again, but no jealousy, we can share, other ships might need him as well and he will turn back, he always turn back.

The North Sea, I’ve never been so far North in my life, in front of us just lay unknown waters.
We are entering Viking’s territories, heading for Skagerrak, the northern point of Denmark, where the Baltic and the North Sea meet. I’m curious to discover new landscapes and different cultures.
Let’s see what the little island of Bornholm has to bring us. We’ll bring them some wine. Is that not a nice present and a good way to make new friends? We gonna deliver some delicious organic and natural wines over there.
That’s our mission, trading the most delicious products from one place to another, to one culture to another. Always under sails.

Great blue sky for all

Collin

Tres Hombres blog: Southwesterlies in the North Sea

Picture by Remi: Cap Gris Nez

As it is to be expected at this season, we are currently facing some quite strong South/West winds while we try to make our way to the dover strait. If it was only for the wind we would sail long tacks from the coast of England to the coast of Belgium and back and we would probably be there already. This would be without the incredible density of maritime traffic, oil rigs, wind farms and fishermen operating in this area.
It is also to be noticed that the usual courtesy that is made to let the sailing vessels pass first does not apply here. Here there is too much business going on and we have to give way to everybody. We all hope for a change in the wind direction tonight that might push us through the straight.

Greetings from the wet but fast learning Tres Hombres crew.

Captain Remi Lavergne