The crossing … (by captain Anne-Flore Gannat)

…of Skagerrak is quite smooth.

20 or 25 kts were expected in the middle so I drew a blue line on the chart, do not pass over. Fortunately we never had to dowse the royal and as soon as the wind increased we turned the ship around towards the peaceful Danish coast. Each watch gets the fun to tack the ship within their watch of 4 or 6 hours.
Set the flying jib and gaff topsail and shade on deck.

I actually would have liked to experience some fair winds again because we have just a little bit now and some questions started to appear from trainees about my arrival date prediction. Between 6,5 and 0,5 kts speed over ground, the guessing is an abstract game. Then we wait patiently with harmonica and guitar melody
at times and sheets repairs.

A falcon is flying around us not as the fulmars who, again, take a dip next to the ship.

Seams like the Tres doesn’t want to run into the shipyard yet to be scraped off, loose her spars and gets some noisy torture machines on her ribs for a moment.

But I try to assure her, in November, she will glide along a flock of sea wings birds. All as strong as her, determined to eat miles and parade with other sister ships.

Anne-Flore

 

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Early history of Tres Hombres Part I

In her 75 years of life, Tres Hombres, has had many different occupations. Starting as a navy vessel for the German Kriegsmarine, being used a a fishing vessel, a package and passenger ferry in Ireland, being laid up at several occasions, and finally becoming an ambassador for the revival of the sailing cargo industry.

Seeadler, was her name when still under German registry. I can not recall if she was built under this name, but what I do know is that her keel was laid in 1943, somewhere in a Northern German shipyard. She was part of a program of the creation of a fleet of KFK”s, about 800 or 900 ships of this type where built. In two or three different diversities of design. The original KFK prototype was designed by an Austrian firm in the thirties. They took a series of hull types of Baltic fishing vessels, assumable sailing vessel hulls, and did one of the first tank tests with them. Through combining these tests, they where able to design a hull with a very small resistance through the water. Great seakeeping capabilities. And the advantage of being able to be effectively maneuvered and propelled, with the smallest amount of propulsion power.

The abbreviation of KFK stands for Kriegs Fischerei Kutter, meaning a vessel designed to be used as a patrol or small army vessel. With the added advantage of the possibility of being utilized as a fishing vessel, after her war duties would be fulfilled. For what exact missions our Tres Hombres served, will probably never be revealed. The story does go, that, after the second world war, she helped to clear the Baltic of mines. And, that during this operation, she even sunk in the Oslo fjord. What we know for sure, is that she picked up her peaceful intentions a few years after the war, and started a fishing career from the port of Kiel.

Truly yours,
Capt. Jorne Langelaan