Sail along with Nordlys during Brest Maritime Festival

Brest’s International Maritime Festival is now getting ready for it’s 7th edition to be held from 13 to 19 July 2016.
The festival will bring together sailing ships, traditional boats and exotic crafts from around the world.A flotilla of 1,500 boats converging in the bay, a once-in-a-lifetime chance to visit the world’s most beautiful ships and to learn about the world’s many seafaring cultures.
Nordlys, manoeuvered entirely by the power of the wind is possibly the worlds oldest cargo ship (1873) still working, will be one of the ships present during these days. You are more than welcome on board to have a look and meet the captain and crew.

On the 19th of july it is possible to sail along with Nordlys from Brest to Douarnenez.
€100,- per person ( food, coffee/ tea included) booking@fairtransport.nl

Nordlys blog: Drifting around in the English Channel.

With about 4 Beaufort of wind we left the foggy Belgium shore behind and set out into the English channel.
To our delight the sky cleared and we where very happy to find out that the sun still existed and seemed to have heard about the fact that it was already June.
However with the sudden appearance of summery weather the wind slowly died down from four to three, to two, to none existent. While the grip files spoke of wind speeds of 5 bf, clouded sky’s and rain we where drifting around the English Channel in blazing sunshine and busied ourself with maintenance, watching purposes and dolphins, getting tanned and occasional swims.

After three days with the more or less total absence of wind and our sails flapping uselessly in some occasional see breezes, all our clamps and pins where shiny with oil there where various new rope mats on board and hardly any line, from the bucket ropes to the halyards and sheets could be found without a proper whipping. We also attempted to power the towing generator with one of the two bikes we brought from Den Helder, but needed more bike parts we wanted to get in the next harbour.

The weather forecasts seemingly realizing that they where about as accurate as a newspaper horoscope started to become more and more vague and mysterious about there forecasts, featuring quite a lot of maybes, occationals and regonallies. Mostly we where left with the conclusion that the only thing we could be sure about, was that the sun would rise in the east the next morning… probably.
After we passed the white cliffs of Dover three times a day, going back and forth with the current, had given names to each of the Dover Coast Guard employees on the radio and created a personal best of channel 16 we agreed on the fact that we had been in one place for too long.

Bosun Luna

Sailing Cargo Vessel Nordlys on her way home

We are happy to tell you Nordlys her ETD (estimated time of departure) is today at +-  14.00

 

Nordlys and her crew will set sail to the Netherlands with a short stop in England. She will have a small cargo of cider on board bound for Van der Lem, our local liquor store in Den Helder. Place your order for sail shipped cider (Netherlands only) by sending an e-mail to trading@fairtransport.nl (we’ll forward it to van der Lem) . You want sail shipped cider in your country too? Get you local store / importer involved in shipping by sail and Contact Us!
We expect Nordlys back at Willemsoord, Den Helder the end of this month. As soon as we know more about her arrival we will post an up-date again!
You might be able to see Nordlys leaving Douarnenez at this link Douarnenez webcam
Ahoy!

NEWS! Nordlys is about to set sail from Douarnenez. – by capt. Lammert

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There is this old saying; “Ship and Men, Rot in Port”.…. For us it is time to go to back to sea.
Although Douarnenez is a beautiful place to be and the people are truly nice over here, now it is going to be time to cast of the lines and set sail. We have to transport precious products with the wind.

The reason of our long stay in Douarnenez, is one I do not wish to overcome to other sailors. For me, being a skipper for some years, this is the first “crazy” accident that happened to me and to the ship. Something I hope will never happen again. Not to me and not to any other sailor as well.

Hard working and tired fishermen at sea, can become a nightmare.  The struggle with the insurance companies is another one, which follows. Because of insurance companies, we were hardly allowed to work on the damage ourselves. We, with Fair Transport, already try to make the world of transport a bit more in the natural way.  Perhaps it is time to slightly convert the insurance system as well. Into one, which is “really” helping people in need.

On the ship, we have been working on caulking the planks and also on the rigging we had things to do. We have been for about one month on the slipway. This is a place with a beautiful view and we could enjoy the sunrise and sunset every day from the ship. Bretagne is just another example of how beautiful the world really is.

Jean-Rene, one of the workers on the slipway, became a good friend.  We were invited to his house, where he lives with his wife and their two children. They are growing their own food and making their own cider. On his land he has been planting more than three thousand trees. A small forest planted by just one man.

Just imagine ….If we all just would treat the world with big respect, like this man does. There would be plenty if everything for all the people in the world. Living within the creation of plenty, instead of creating plenty of plenty we don’t really need.

There was enough time for cultural exploration in Bretagne. We have been visiting the countryside and the coastline. We were invited on small farms and harvesting our food our selves. One day we helped Paulette, a beautiful Breton lady with a small farm. We helped picking apples for making a delicious apple juice. We’ve got twenty bottles for the ship out of the total production of four hundred twenty bottles. The money for the apple juice is for a cinema project, which travels by sailing boat with the name  “Sobre las Olas”.  They perform interesting documentaries about the beautiful and crazy world we are living in.

Jeroen, our cook, was cooking two times in a local restaurant and we were all invited. Chez Mathurin is just the best restaurant in town; delicious food and only natural wine. We made a lot of contacts and friends.  People come by to bring fresh fish, apples, vegetables and so on. Life is not too bad here in Dournenez,

We have been sailing on a small boat to “Ile de Sein”. This is a small island west of Finisterre. The roughness of this place, where the ocean meets the land, is just amazing. Rocks, waves, current and swell… We were sailing all the way into the harbor, without using the stinking machine, and the next day we sailed out only by the wind. Anne-Flore , thank you so much for this awesome weekend.

We’ve been visiting the boat building school and sail maker school in town. There is a big community on building of and sailing with traditional boats in Douarnenez. We met Christoph from “ Plein Mer”. They are doing a very nice job on building and restoring old wooden boats. Of course a lot of people came a board to visit the Nordlys. Every time people who come on Nordlys are amazed of the fact, the ship is having no engine at all.

We adjusted a mast and sail on our dinghy, so we can go sailing in the harbor. It’s a beautiful wooden dinghy, perfect for sailing and rowing. Most of the crew had some time of. Time to visit family and friends. After two years hard working on Nordlys to make her sail again, it was a good moment for some rest as well. Live is not only about working.

One Saturday we organized a party on the boat. The cargo hold was still empty, so we transformed it into a dancing place. There was only organic beer and natural wine….. and of course some Tres Hombres rum. A big success it was.

Right now the ship and her crew are ready to go back at sea. We have some time to do sail training and little adjustment on the rigging. We managed to organize a cargo of Breton Cider for England and the Netherlands, which we can deliver to the cargo owners before the winter feasts. On board, everybody is delighted to have this cargo on board right now. We show the world, transport can be done in a different way.

“In die Ruhe liegt die Kraft”, as they say in Germany. Right now I am working on the adjustments of the sea charts. The North Sea starts to look like an industrial zone. A lot of oil and gas riggings, highways for the big ships, new wind farms for the so called “green energy”.  In between they create some marine reserve areas.  I hope there will be still some place to sail.

These are the waters we are going to sail. It is winter right now, so it will be cold. Most of the storms will hit the north of Ireland and Scotland. We will take the right window according to the forecasts. Whole the crew is excited to do this trip. We have enough warm clothes and sail back to Den Helder and prepare the ship for next year’s program.

We have cargo to sail and inspire the people with what we do……

Let’s combine our forces and make it happen!

Captain Lammert

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May Nordlys be ready to return to sea soon !!! by capt. Lammert

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Ahoy dear Sailorfriends,

It has been a while since some news from the good cargo sailing vessel Nordlys became public. We have been also quite busy over here.

At the moment the Nordlys is on the slipway in Douarnenez. The work on the damage of the collision is being carried out by some companies from Douarnenez. At the moment we are five people on board, and helping as much as we can. The atmosphere is getting a lot better everyday again.

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Since the moment we departed from Den Helder, until now, it has been quite an adventure I may say.
Sailing the maidentrip on the completely refitted Nordlys, originally build in 1873, as a captain and crew, is an experience once in a lifetime.

The voyage from Den Helder till Brixham we made an average of seven knots and Nordlys performed very well at sea. In Brixham we could do some caulking, because she was making some water. This all normal for an old lady like Nordlys.

After two years of refit and a wharf time in between, all the planks have to settle themselves. This is only possible in the first waves at sea. To make a stop underway for caulking and checking the underwater ship was all planned. Sailing along the coast I had different harbors already in mind.

Brixham was although the best and most beautiful harbor to make a stop, since the Nordlys originally as build at the English south coast. A lot of people came by and were happy to see Nordlys and we very interested in her life story. An old fisherman called Jim, came by and could confirm she was built in 1873 at the wharf in Yarmouth. According to this man, Nordlys was most probably not built as a trawler but as a trading ship. He is having access to the ships registration lists from the old days and is going to find out more on the history of the Nordlys.

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The weather was good to continue our trip to Douarnenez for unloading the rum and so we did. We noticed the ship was making a lot less water than before and we were proud of ourselves, and the work we had done. Nordlys was sailing beautiful. When we passed Ile d’Ouessant, we had to sail full and by and were tacking all the way into the Bay of Douarnenez. It was above my expectation how close to the wind Nordlys can sail. We did not even had the jib flying in the reasonable calm weather we had at that time.

Saturday evening we arrived close to Douarnenez . Monday the tugboat was available for us to bring us to port. I decided to drop anchor in an official anchor place, about one and a half mile from the coast. Also I had contact with VTS Cross Corsen about our anchoring.

Since this was the first time using the anchor I didn’t want to be to close to land. The anchor was holding good. Sunday there was a sailing regatta of 4’20 s and optimists in the bay. This was a nice spectacle to view and we enjoyed a nice and calm Sunday.

 

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Next day the tugboat would come in the afternoon. We were all prepared and excited to go in port to unload our first cargo. This was all going to change dramatically next day. Early in the morning I woke up by a big crash, I run out and saw the whole aft ship being destroyed. A fishing boat was close by, heading away from us in the direction of the port entrance. It took a while before she turned around (It took some time to change the autopilot to manual steering as it seemed) and she collided us almost a second time on our bow.

All the crew was now on deck and luckily at the moment of impact, nobody was at the toilet. Nordlys was making water because of the collision and with the pump running, we were being tugged into port by the rescue boat.

The same day we were standing dry on the slipway and first a lot of paperwork had to be done. More than a week has been passed before the actual reparations could begin. I truthfully belief there must be a reason for everything what is happening in life. At the moment I still cannot figure out a reason for this sad story yet. I think we will never now. Anyway; right now we are going to work on Nordlys and make her even better than she already was.

 

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Tres Hombres is also in Dournenez, they are busy loading wine and preparing the ship and crew for the next Atlantic crossing. The presence of Francois and Wiebe, here in Douarnenez, is a big support for me. Thank you friends.

We organized a barbeque underneath the Nordlys for everybody and had a beautiful evening. We had a feast for life and for cargo sailing. We laughed and we cried. We toasted a rum on the Nordlys.

Tres Hombres and Nordlys together in Douarnenez! A little bit different as we all had expected.

May Nordlys be ready to return to sea soon !!!

Gerhard, Jeroen, Haerri, Lucie, Tristan, Jetna, Ivo and Fabian (the first crew of Nordlys) Thank you so much so far, on the first voyage with the Nordlys. Also Karl and Dave for helping out, and of course everybody else who is supporting us in whatever way.

Liberté pour tout le monde,

Lammert

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We pass the port Rhu Lock – by Captain François

DATE: 16-10-15 GMT:1200  pos Douarnenez peer

GENERAL SYNOPSIS: ON BOARD THE TRES HOMBRES

WIND DIR:North

WIND SPD:5knots

CURRENT DIR:Revere flow

CLOUDS:Total overcast

SEA TEMP:12ºC

AIR TEMP: 14ºC

AIR PRES: 1020 hPa

We pass the port Rhu Lock

Two days waiting for good tide and good wind to enter the harbor
At 8 this morning with the Tug ville d’Ys and the sailing school dingys
Tres Hombres moored at “Place de l’enfer”
All the Nordelys’ crew was on the lock with fenders
Exiting moment for us

As soon we squared the deck, the unloading start
Rust blasting, painting etc as well

we’ll have some rest later
This is how things goes on fair transport ships

Monday, we’ll load wine for Barbados

Francois

Sail along with Tres Hombres 1st of Oct. 2015

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Sail along with engineless sailing cargo vessel ‪#‎TresHombres‬ from Netherlands – to France – to Spain! booking@fairtransport.nl

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A full load of wine – By Capt. Andreas

DATE: 4/7/2015 GMT:1331  POS: off the Bill of Portland COG: 085 SOG: 5,5

GENERAL SYNOPSIS: ON BOARD THE TRES HOMBRES

WIND DIR: SW

WIND SPD: 4-5

CURRENT DIR: W

CLOUDS: 2/8

SEA STATE: 2-3

SEA TEMP: 16,5

AIR TEMP: 16

AIR PRES: 1021

Douarnenez, our friendly little French homeport situated in the awesome Baie de Douarnenez in Bretagne, welcomed us with great summer weather, just the wind let us down a bit as we were late exactly one hour for our rendezvous at the lock, after about 1000 M tacking down from Den Helder. That gave us time for a swim and a good preparation of the maneuver to sail onto the buoy next to the old harbour. The Dinghy waiting for us with a 20m line at the buoy, they had to really stretch it out as we came around the corner and swung her up in the wind, standing still with the dolphin striker above the dinghy. Make fast the line, sails down, square away the deck, put up the tent and come together midships for a final muster and a good glass of rum, welcome to Douarnenez!

Guillaume and Diana welcomed as warm and helpful as ever, and after an effective briefing with the guys from the little tugs, he flooded the deck with fine Biodynamic wine and cider from the next village, which we used to celebrate the departure of almost all trainees, finishing long after the last light dimmed in town.

The next day it all happened, We went through the lock into tho old port Rhu, made fast and started immediately unloading the 10 barrels which went round the Atlantic on the ship. Hereafter cleaned the hold and prepared for a full load of wine, this time with wine in bottles, bound for Copenhagen. Luckily th wine we tasted the night before was biodynamic, so the grape power did not stay in our head but in our muscles, moving about 26 tonnes of wine into the hold before dinner!
As we had some space free we filled that the next day with 2 pallets of cider and some local produced sardines, also bound for Copenhagen.

When we left the port we chose a day with little wind and luckily the official tug boat had no crew, so we could just use just the old wooden tug, pushing us safely out for free and letting us off just after the locks by Ile de Tristan. After a night anchored in the western swell north of Tristan, we weighed anchor before sunrise at 4 in the morning with the first breeze and gently jibed out of the bay, with Remi sailing along closely on his boat, underway to Brest. He helped out a lot as local guide, having a hard time to leave again, after many months at sea on this magic ship. The same with Francois, what went so far that someone with a little boat had to get him off the anchorage and bring him to a house near the cliffs in this bay! Thanks, french connection, for the good care you lend to her!

After passing the inside of Quessant again, we aimed for Brixham as next stop, where we met with Toni Knights and his Looe lugger Iris, who is very keen to also join the sailing cargo alliance. This is a network of sailing vessels, aimed to take over as much cargo as possible from steam and road transport and promote hard against useless, dirty carriage of cheap trash from poor to rich which is just accelerating the degeneration of the western world in a crazy speed. Also joining are ships like the Greyhound, the Avontuur, the Alva and hopefully many more…

Just in the last moment before setting sail again, we welcomed Tim from the Cornish seaweed company onboard, who brought us some samples of their hand harvested sea produce, which we will have on board for the ships market. After dropping him off we left the mooring with SW winds which will hopefully carry us along the Channel without making new AIS drawings all over the waters between England and France.

All the best from ship and crew,

Andreas

a day by day story – by Karl

DATE:  GMT:  POS:  N, W COG:  SOG:

GENERAL SYNOPSIS: ON BOARD THE TRES HOMBRES

WIND DIR:

WIND SPD:

CURRENT DIR:

CLOUDS:

SEA STATE:

SEA TEMP:

AIR TEMP:

AIR PRES:

Monday 15th  of June

Right on!
Punctually at ten the tugboat pushes the Tres Hombres out of /Den /Helder.
First four volunteers were already on the topmast yard to set royal and gallant sails. Up the shrouds and down again. Into the North Sea. Wind 4 from aft to half.
Setting sails, pulling the ropes makes everybody sweat.
Waves one to two meters from windward, the Tres Hombres takes off with eight knots.
All hands of the eight trainees are needed. After half an hour eleven sails are set except for the outer jib and the ship is rolling and rocking and swaying from side to side. Only one seasick man.
First watch 8pm to midnight, four hours of sleep not really slept.

Tuesday 16th
Second watch for our port group from4 to 8am. Wearing all my warm underwear, sweaters, jumpers to keep warm plus a watertight overall.
Wind calming down. Then at 9am suddenly windstill.
The dutch coastline is crammed full of windmill parks. A good sign for sustainable energy production. Lots of tankers and cargo ships to keep an eye on.

Wednesday 17th
Wind 4 to 5 turning southward stomping through the waves. Got to tack two times.
At 2 pm north of Margate with white cliffs around at anchor for a couple of hours. Twelve sails hauled down. Not quite clear which ropes belong to which sail.We were running out of loorolls.
Speedboat hoisted into the water to buy them, then hauled back on deck.
Lessons by the navigator Camille repeating and showing us all the ropes.
During maneuvers everybody sweats, like hoisting anchor. Manually of course. Then two to three hours to unwind and change wet underwear.
Two hours later theTres Hombres under full sails cutting its way through the waves. Wind 7 to 8.
The royal, outer and inner jib sails gafff and course have to be pulled down. Camille on the upper yard to fasten royal while the mast sways wildly from side to side at full speed. Ten knots!
Good lord! The ship heeling with the water to the deck!

Thursday 18th
Sailing across the channel between Dover and Calais is  like a ship motorway. Ferries real close and freighters all around. A few hours of rain to keep us awake. Everybody in best mood. Conversations, and fruit salad scrambled eggs with garlic served by Guiseppe, our italiian cook who has. always got a joke up his sleeve.
Pointe Blanche on port. Five hours no wind. French Coastguard is giving us a visit. Tonight deep and sound sleep. Washing and shaving maybe tomorrow. Spirits still high. Language on board is english, naturally. We got six dutch, one danish, three french one italian, two german  persons here on board

Friday 19th
Good wind along the Normandy coast, 35 mi. west of Dieppe wind simmers down again. Time to rehearse all the sheets, braces, up and downhaul ropes, trimm and reeflines, halyards, cargo hoists,
While tacking I realise, which ones I got mixed up with. But its getting  better.
Navigation tasks are included. Lots of brainwork today
Appetite is increasing although sleeping hours vary and everybody loooks bright and very content.
Waking up hearing laughter and talking brightens up every day!
We have a mechanic, ex divers, a cocktail and rum specialist, a science journalist,  a truck driver, a doctors aide, an ophtalmologist all under the command of captain Andreas turning into a reliable team. Its a joy to have the privilege to sail with a thoughtful, calm, collected captain who never loses his temper and keeps smiling regarding all my mistakes and clumsyness.

Saturday20th
The night was windy and cold and we had to turn north again since we were getting too close to the french coastline. Tack around midnight. All men and women on deck for the maneouver. We are getting better with the lines even during stronger wind .
Close to the Cape de la Hague another calm wind period, Piet repairs the pumps and lets the outboard engine look like new. Victoria, Rick, Lita and Stefan sandscraping old paint, captain Andreas occupied with the maintenance of valves and other equipment.
Meanwhile the current pushes us back 15 mi. From 2pm on wind is coming up again, freshening up 3 to4 from northwest. We have to  tack to sail in north direction, then tack again southward. Getting ahead now at good speed high up against the wind. Freightships crossing, two sailboats passing nearby. The wind keeps whisteling through the tackle all night. Everything is all right, the mind is clear and the body is getting used to the irregular sleeping hours.
Current and wind against us but, conditions are fair

Sunday 21st
Solstice! Wind 6. Finally heading south again. Trainee Florian up the windward shroud to untie the royal. In the upmost yard while the ship is stompingand heeling. All sails up! Racing at 7 to 8 knots, 15 mi. From the Isle of Wight we tack in direction to Alderney. Got to take the western route. Tack again, wich always means pulling sheets and braces as fast and hard as you can! Moving north northwest again into Lyme Bay. The captain has a cup of fabulous french red wine for everybody to celebrate this special day. Now after another tack demanding our entire body power we are sailing southward with westerly wind blowing at 6 to 7.
The captain may sometimes look serious but never angry and soon a smile appears on his face. Many years of maritime experience in any weather conditions gives us all a feeling of confidence.
What a wild ride we are having on this shiny day with a strong wind from west northwest!

Monday 22nd
Cloudy skies, rain dripping off the sails with a nice wind blowing still. The good mood cannot be altered. Dry cleaning gets a new different meaning. It keeps on raining all day until 5pm. We have to work our way through two more tackings and then the Tres Hombres really flies under full sail 9.2 knots through two meter waves, sea gulls gliding along with us. Taking over the helm gives me the feeling that this vessel is really sturdy built in steel framework with wooden body and deck, a 130 ton beauty. She ploughs her way through these irregular peaks of foam and spray, Sensational!
Good night and thanks for this unique and soul warming adventure..

Tuesday 23rd
Midnight watch until 4 am. Last multicolored stripes and a silver moon sickle disappearing. This experience to be able to see this marvelous blue planet with the ocean all around  can only  be had on a sailship with no engine hammering. Plancton lights up as the bow kicks up a foamy front wave and the milky way shows us all its splendour while the night air hushes along our thirteen sails. The flyer is up giving us another knot of speed, now 7.1 knots, while the light towers of western Brittany pass by, the highest and most famous one being the Phare du Four.
This journey is almost coming to an end, so before it does, here is a special thanks to captain Andreas who has got this sparkle in his eyes because he loves his job and the ideals it stands for, and his great unforgettable crew.  Wiebe, the first mate with his curly long blonde hair and the sonore voice when he sings his ballads from the netherlands playing the guitar, the contagious smile Francois the bosun shows when he is in full action, Camille the navigator, always debonair teaching us the secrets of navigation and going through all the lines and ropes with us again and again. Thirtyfive on each side, Guiseppe, the maestro of the galley realm keeping us going with hisitalian inspired meals. Not to forget the two deck hands Victoria and Soizic never hesitating to accomplish any task. Wether climbing up to the highest yard or onto  the jib when the 315 square meters of sails have to be set and all the other tough work this lady demands from her crew.
This is certainly not a luxury voyage with waiters all around you plus entertainment.
All trainees are asked to be ready and willing to learn and help on deck. All different people with different nationalities then form a team, and I see that each and everyone is glad to have participated in this exceptional adventure. Hope to see you all again!!Dios os proteja y bendiga!
Yours truly,
Karl

Salut Penn Sardine by Cleem Doedens, Rianne de Beer and Rémi Lavergne

GENERAL SYNOPSIS: ON BOARD THE TRES HOMBRES

WIND DIR:WSW

WIND SPD:4

CURRENT DIR:S

CLOUDS:7/8

SEA STATE:2

SEA TEMP:16.3

AIR TEMP:15

AIR PRES:1013

 

Penn is the Breton word for head, so Penn Sardine means sardine-head and the people of Douarnenez are proud to be called so, because of the historical importance of the sardine fishing and canning. The sardines left, but the name stayed. Douarnenez is already out of sight for a few days, but not out of mind and heart.
In many ways our stay there was a good one. Of course for the cargo: the unloading of the Exeter ale (beer) and the loading of ten 220 l. barrels of young wine to be aged on board the Tres Hombres.
There was a lot of public interest and from the put alress. To some people we owe our special thanks. In the first place Guillaume Le Grand and Diana Mesa of TOWT, who made the press attention happen, were a party in the cargo handling but also available to help out whenever necessary. Together with the Port-Musée they organized the round table meeting on sailing cargo. We worked together in a good and cooperative atmosphere.

 

[one_third]rianneRianne

Cleem

remiRemi[/one_third]

[two_third_last]

Rianne : Bar(re)Tribord was our living room during our stay in Port Rhu. The first evening all the crew left to a bar while dinner was still being prepared on board. A few hours later the cook had to go looking for her goats and figured the first accessible bar would be the most likely one to find them. And what a nice tavern it turned out to be! The owners Olivier and Pascal were very welcoming to the then slightly agitated cook and told here they would be more then happy to accommodate for dinner to be served at the tavern. Assuming this would be a one time favor, to my surprise the next day Olivier insisted on preparing crabs for lunch and arranged a copious amount of these crawling creatures to be delivered at the ship. Following were three man firmly ad vicing me how  to cook, cut, eat and enjoy the crabs. And what a feast it was! All in the welcoming atmosphere of Barre Tribord. Olivier preferred for the crew to fill up his tavern and sometimes even closed it from other visitors (´they just distract me from you guys´).

 

I felt inspired to make the best of this generous hospitality and I served the following dishes with great pleasure accompanied by Herman (Jappapppa!) on the accordion, and Captain Boogie on the piano, that had to be unloaded from the cargohold. Every evening in Dournanez became a warm familiar gathering with lots of laughter, singing and good conversations.

 

I also enjoyed my fare share of sardines in tomato sauce in honour of my father- who just turned 65 -for he teached me as a child that canned sardines are the gastronomic equivalent of a succulent sole prepared on buttery sweet celeriac puree with a tart white wine souce in case all those ingredients are not at hand. And the crepes…. and the butter… and o yes don´t forget the Bigournos (Alikruiken), Rilette de Tete, Crepe Complet, the organic wine from Steven and Valerie (Cháteau le Puy), Rum au Vanille and the very best soft and crispy Eclair from the boulangarie that have changed my life for the better! The Tres Hombres crew indulged themselves in all the best Brittannie had to offer and in return, it seams, she only wanted to give us more. And so we had to leave before we got to fat and lazy.[/two_third_last]

 

Salut Penn Sardine by Cleem Doedens, Rianne de Beer and Rémi Lavergne